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Indigenous Solidarity Room 2010

[NOTE: The information below pertains to the 2010 Montreal Anarchist Bookfair.]

co-organized by the Indigenous Solidarity Committee (Montreal) & the Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement (Ottawa)

SATURDAY, MAY 29, 2010, 11am-5pm

Room 302 of the CEDA, 2515 rue Delisle (métro Lionel Groulx)

Building on previous Solidarity Rooms at the Montreal Anarchist Bookfair, the 2010 Indigenous Solidarity Room highlights Indigenous struggles for land, freedom, dignity and self-determination, hearing directly from the voices and experiences of Indigenous activists.

11am-12:45pm: 500 Years of Indigenous Resistance

The “500 Years of Resistance Comic Book” (Arsenal Pulp Press) is a powerful and historically accurate graphic portrayal of Indigenous resistance to the European colonization of the Americas, beginning with the Spanish invasion under Christopher Columbus and ending with the Six Nations Land Reclamation in 2006. Gord Hill spent two years unearthing images and researching historical information to create his publication, which presents the story of Aboriginal resistance in a far-reaching format. He will launch his groundbreaking book at the Montreal Anarchist Bookfair with a special slideshow presentation.

Gord Hill (Kwakwaka’wakw) is an indigenous artist and organizer who has been active with the Native Youth Movement and other groups. He is a main contributor to www.no2010.com as well as Warrior Publications, and was active with the Olympic Resistance Network of the Coast Salish Territories.

1pm-2:45pm: Justice for Missing, Murdered and Disappeared Indigenous Women

According to Indigenous sources, there are up to 3000 Indigenous women who have gone missing or been murdered in Canada since 1980. The hundreds of missing, murdered and disappeared Indigenous women in Canada, and the lack of proper accountability and necessary resources to seek justice and truth, shows the colonialist, racist and sexist underpinnings of Canadian society. This workshop will explore this reality, with Bridget Tolley as a resource person, sharing her experiences and knowledge.

Bridget Tolley is an Algonquin from the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg. On October 5, 2001, her mother, Gladys Tolley, was fatally struck by a Sûreté du Québec (SQ) patrol car on Highway 105, outside Maniwaki (Quebec). Bridget is fighting for an independent investigation into her mother’s death.

3pm-5pm: 20 Years Since Oka: Kanienkehaka Communities in Resistance

Twenty years ago this July, the people of Kanehsatake and Kahnawake rose up in defense of their ancestral lands, facing off against government officials, the police, and the Canadian Army. Kanienkehaka (Mohawk) communities have been on the forefront of resistance to colonialism in Canada. The events at Kanehsatake and Kahnawake were a crucial landmark in the history of Indigenous resistance to colonialism, and in the assertion of Indigenous self-determination. This workshop, with the participation of Clifton Arihwakehte, will look back at the events of 1990, as well as deepen our understanding of current struggles, particularly at Kanehsatake against the Niocan mining company.

Clifton Arihwakehte is a member of the Kanehsatake Mohawk Community and a participant in the events of 1990.