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Workshops & Presentations

BookfairWorkshop2014Workshops & Presentations at the Montreal Anarchist Bookfair (May 27 & 28)
SCHEDULE IN BRIEF

(full descriptions are included below)

(see the Saturday workshops at a glance HERE.)

(see the Sunday workshops at a glance HERE.)

All workshops will include whisper translation into English (EN) or French (FR).
CCGV = Centre Culturel Georges-Vanier (2450 rue Workman)
CEDA = Centre d’éducation populaire de la Petite-Bourgogne et de St-Henri (2515 rue Delisle)

Saturday, May 27
11am-12:45pm

- Neither Quebec, Nor Canada: Understanding our colonial history to better confront it, Canada Day 2017 (Ni Quebec, ni Canada) – CÉDA, Room #119 (FR)
- I’m Not Gay, I’m Angry: An Overview of Contemporary LGBTQIA+ Activism (Vincent Mousseau) – CÉDA, Room #123 (EN)
- Neuro-anarchy: Kids’ Edition (Montreal Childcare Collective) – CÉDA, Room #123 (EN)
- Resisting the Far-Right (Resist Trump and the Far-Right Network) – CCGV, Room #2,100 (FR)

Saturday, May 27
1pm-2:45pm

- Demanding the Impossible: The Practice and Relevance of Anarchism (Jaggi Singh) – CÉDA, Room #119 (EN)
- Activist Media and Secure Practices (GAPPA) – - CÉDA, Room #123 (FR)
- Parents and Caregivers Caucus (Montreal Childcare Collective) – CÉDA, Room #125 (EN/FR)
- (Film) Anarchist KINO Presentations (Insurgent Projections) – CCGV, Room #1,100 (FR)
- Intern Strike, Women’s Strike! The struggle for the recognition of student labour (Comités unitaires sur le travail étudiant) – CCGV, Room #2,100 (FR)
- War In The Neighborhood: An explosive history of the struggle for housing (Seth Tobocman) – CCGV, Room #0,100 (Salle d’exposition) (EN)

Saturday, May 27
3pm-4:45pm

- Anarchism, what is it for? (Roxanne and Thomas) – CÉDA, Room #119 (FR)
- Don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater : The overlap of identity politics and (Insurrectional) Anarchism (Andrea & Dylan) – CÉDA, Room #123 (FR)
- Film: Ce n’est qu’un début: La philo avec les enfants (Montreal Childcare Collective) – CÉDA, Room #125 (FR)
- Anti-gentrification struggles: Reflections and Practices (chlag.info) – CCGV, Room #1,100 (FR)
- The commons in contemporary radical politics (Silvia Federici) – CCGV, Room #2,100 (EN)

Sunday, May 28
11am-12:45pm

- No Gods, No Masters, No Peripheries: Global Anarchisms (Silvia Federici & Raymond Craib) – CÉDA, Room #119 (EN)
- Building A Solidarity City Together! (Solidarity Across Borders) – CÉDA, Room #125 (FR)
- Silkscreening for the Revolution (Sidetracks) – CCGV, Room #SS 100 (FR)
- Anarchism and Tenant Organizing (Hamilton Tenants’ Solidarity Network) – CCGV, Room #2,100 (EN)

Sunday, May 28
1pm-2:45pm

- Anarchy 101 (Dylan) – CÉDA, Room #119 (EN)
- Drugs in Anarchist Scenes: Confronting Taboos and Sharing Knowledge (Jérôme) – CÉDA, Room #123 (FR)
- No Wall They Can Build: Confronting the US-Mexico Border Wall (Raúl Alcaraz Ochoa) – CÉDA, Room #125 (EN)
- Towards a Queer Insurrection (Charlie and Jordan) – CCGV, Room #1,100 (FR)
- Working Through Assault, Disposability, and Abuse in Anarchist Communities (Raissa Simone) – CCGV, Room #2,100 (EN)
- LiveArt: Au moins il nous reste le doigt d’vote (David Widgington) – outdoors, near CCGV (FR)

Sunday, May 28
3pm-4:45pm

- Anarchist Strategies to Shut Down the Tar Sands (Rebel! Rebuild! Rewild!) – CÉDA, Room #119 (EN)
- Disability and Anarchism / Disability in Anarchism (Noah E) – CÉDA, Room #123 (EN)
- (Film) Trouble #3: Refugees Welcome (sub.Media) – CÉDA, Room #125 (EN)
- Subverting politics, culture and economics: the journey of the Autonomous Social Center and of Building 7 in Point-St. Charles (Anna Kruzynski) – CCGV, Room #1,100 (FR)
- Handling sexist and sexual violence in anarchist scenes: How to think of a justice that participates in the abolition of systems and structures of oppression (Laurence and Geneviève) – CCGV, Room #2,100 (FR)
- Self Defense for Women, Trans*, Gender Non-Conforming, and Femme Folk (Schroder) – outdoors, near CCGV (EN)

All workshops will include whisper translation into English (EN) or French (FR).
CCGV = Centre Culturel Georges-Vanier (2450 rue Workman)
CEDA = Centre d’éducation populaire de la Petite-Bourgogne et de St-Henri (2515 rue Delisle)

(full descriptions are posted below)

Neither Quebec, Nor Canada: Understanding our colonial history to better confront it, Canada Day 2017 (FR)

Saturday, May 27, 11am – 12:45pm

CÉDA, Room #119

We will be discussing KKKanada’s colonial history in the context of its 150th anniversary. We will also be discussing the foundation of KKKanada and KKKebec in the context of Western colonization and how, as settlers, we can attack their foundations while at the same time building active solidarity with Indigenous people in struggle.

Presented by Ni Quebec, ni Canada – an anti-colonial, anti-racist, anti-patriarchal, and anti-capitalist project.

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I’m Not Gay, I’m Angry: An Overview of Contemporary LGBTQIA+ Activism (EN)

Saturday, May 27, 11am – 12:45pm

CÉDA, Room #123

The histories of queer and trans identities are based in struggle. Riots and violent resistance are commonplace in our communities, from Compton’s Cafeteria to Stonewall, and from Montreal’s Sex Garage to Toronto’s bathhouse raids. This workshop will guide participants through the basics of contemporary North American LGBTQIA+ activist movements, as well as the legacy of this struggle that exists in these communities to this day. In an effort to underline the multiple discriminations of LGBTQIA+ people of colour, particular focus will be placed on the (often erased) racialized aspects of these struggles. Open to all. Priority for queer and trans people, especially QTBIPOC.

Vincent Mousseau is a Black, queer and trans community organizer, activist, and educator whose areas of expertise include anti-oppressive framework, intersectional analysis, Black Lives Matter activism, and contemporary anti-assimilationist queer activism.

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Neuro-anarchy: Kids’ Edition

Saturday, May 27, 11am – 12:45pm

Room #125, CÉDA, 2515 rue Delisle

This workshop is meant to be space for parents / caregivers of Autistic and similarly “neurodivergent” kids (ADHD, Non-Verbal Learning Disability, Dyslexia, Dyspraxia, etc) to come together and discuss what it means to be raising and/or caring for a child who functions in ways considered to be outside of society’s standards if you don’t believe in society’s standards in the first place.  What does it mean to be a parent / caregiver who challenges and rejects state authority while still having to rely on state-based services for one’s kid? How can we foster mutual aid and the creation of non-state-based resources that specifically accounts for specific needs that Autistic and otherwise “neurodivergent” kids may have? This will be a space to discuss and reflect on these and similar questions as well as a space for parents / caregivers to share tips, resources, and experiences.  People who are not parents / caregivers of Autistic or “neurodivergent” kids are welcome to attend, but we ask that people respect that the space is being prioritized for those who are parents / caregivers of Autistic or “neurodivergent” kids.

Kids of all ages welcome! Toys and books for kids will be available in the workshop.

Facilitated by Noah E, member of the Montreal Childcare Collective.

The rise of the Far-Right here and abroad: Learn to Act (FR)

Saturday, May 27, 11am – 12:45pm

CCGV, Room 2.100

A workshop intended to introduce people to Far-right groups in so-called Quebec and so-called Canada as well as getting them familiarized with groups who are resisting the rise of the far-right. The workshop will go over the history of these movements here and abroad and how they have spread to mainstream politics. The workshop will provide space for attendants to propose and explore their ideas of how to resist the far-right from an anti-oppressive and anti-authoritarian perspective and connect with groups already doing so.

Facilitated by members of the Resist Trump and the Far-Right Network.

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Demanding the Impossible: The Practice and Relevance of Anarchism (EN)

Saturday, May 27, 1pm – 2:45pm

Room #119, CÉDA, 2515 rue Delisle

This workshop will outline the basic principles of anarchism, from its historical
 origins, to inspirations and antecedents from diverse cultures and movements. From
 support work with prisoners, migrants and victims of police brutality, to inspiring 
insurrections and uprisings world wide, we’ll explore the tangible practice of
 anarchist values of self organization, mutual aid, solidarity and autonomous action.
We will look at meaningful examples of self-organization and resistance from Kabylie
 & Chiapas to Mapuche territories & the Iroquois Confederacy. In particular, this workshop will stress those aspects of anarchism that are inherently threatening to mainstream society. This workshop is intended for Bookfair participants who are new to, or curious about, anarchist ideas and practice (not for people already quite familiar with anarchism).

Presented by Jaggi Singh. Jaggi is an organizer with Solidarity Across Borders as well as a member of the Montreal Anarchist Bookfair collective.

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Activist Media and Secure Practices (FR)

Saturday, May 27, 1pm – 2:45pm

CÉDA, Room #123

What is activist media? How can we envision both its autonomous and ally role? How can we develop more secure practices for activists? GAPPA, an autonomous media collective, invites you to reflect on these question based on videos produced by activist media.

Facilitated by GAPPA (Le Guet des Activités Paralogiques, Propagandistes et Anti-démocratiques), a local autonomous media collective.

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Parents and Caregivers Caucus (BIL)

Saturday, May 28, 1pm – 2:45pm

CÉDA, Room #125

This caucus is open to all parents and caregivers who would like to discuss issues of concern, share frustrations, tips, and strategies, as well as network with other parents and caregivers. There will be a facilitator present, but the content of the discussion will be determined by those who attend.

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Anarchist KINO Film Presentations (FR)

Saturday, May 28, 1pm – 2:45pm

CCGV, Room 1.100

KIN(A) is a new initiative by Insurgent Projections and the Anarchist Film Festival. Like the KINOs all over the world, we’ve decided to create an anarchist KINO. The idea of KIN(A) is to create short anti-oppressive films between 1 to 3 minutes. This space will be to project the films created recently as part of KIN(A).

Presented by Insurgent Projections.

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Intern Strike, Women’s Strike! The struggle for the recognition of student labour (FR)

Saturday, May 28, 1pm – 2:45pm

CCGV, Room 2.100

In February, CUTE (Unitary Committees on Student Labour) launched a call for an intern strike. Since unpaid internships are normally found within traditionally “feminine” fields, this call was part of the broader call for an international women’s strike initiated by NiUnaMenos. Internships are only the most visible part of student work. Inspired by the Wages for House-work and Wages for Students campaigns, the campaign for the recognition of studies as a work seeks to anchor student struggles in feminist and workers’ struggles, organized on autonomous and decentralized bases. The goal of this workshop is to publicize the CUTE campaign as well as to provide a space for critical exchanges on education and the student movement.

Presented by CUTE-UQAM. CUTE (Unitary Committees on Student Labour). CUTE proposes a new form of organization focusing on the formation of independent committees of student associations and national groupings and decentralized coordination. With the campaign for the recognition of studies as work, notably through the remuneration of internships, the CUTE struggle against the corporatist trends that reproduce the hierarchy between the disciplines and the teaching orders.

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War In The Neighborhood: An explosive history of the struggle for housing (EN)

Saturday, May 28, 1pm – 2:45pm

CCGV, Room #0,100 (Art Gallery)

Seth Tobocman will present his organizing, his book, and the history of anti-gentrification struggles in the Lower East Side of New York City during the 1980s and 90s.

Seth Tobocman, a squatter in the Lower East Side during the 1980s, is the co-creator of World War III Illustrated. He’s the author of many works, including You Don’t Have to Fuck People Over to Survive (AK Press), Disaster and Resistance (PM Press) and Len. A Lawyer in History (AK Press). His graphic novel, War In The Neighborhood, recounts a decades long struggle in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, through the eyes of migrants, the homeless, punks, the poor, all for whom solidarity and self-organization become weapons.

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Anarchism, what is it for? (FR)

Saturday, May 27, 3pm – 4:45pm

CÉDA, Room #119

This workshop is geared towards people who know little about anarchism and who are curious about its ideology and current practice. It is a participatory workshop where people will be invited to share their experiences or doubts about anarchism. What is anarchism? How is it manifested in 2017? Do I see myself reflected in it? This workshop’s goals are to make anarchism more accessible, to provide an overview of its different tendencies, and to give contemporary examples of the movement.

Co-facilitated by Thomas and Roxanne.

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Don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater : The overlap of identity politics and (Insurrectional) Anarchism (FR)

Saturday, May 27, 3pm – 4:45pm

CÉDA, Room #123

Identity politics, or also similarly grouped concepts under the banner of anti-oppression politics, emerged as a way of understanding the unequal flow of power in the world. Its widespread adoption in anti-capitalist milieus has been valuable for marginalized people. Some of its applications have been less helpful and consequently, critiques of identity politics have surfaced as well. The facilitators of this workshop are often perplexed at how the use of these critiques has created such large divergences in areas where perhaps there ought not to be as well as the defence for fucked up/oppressive behavior. Seeing a lack of the circulation of certain pertinent ideas on either side of this split, this workshop is meant to open dialogue in dusty corners. With the intention of taking the best ideas forward, the facilitators feel the need to work against the constant pressure for political purity and subcultural coolness. While the facilitators have drawn from certain theories and ideas of others, this is meant to be a deep discussion of the way these ideas manifest themselves within our lived experiences and constant struggle, not a hyper-theoretical back and forth. Ultimately, how do we move forward offensively against this world while negotiating the specific ways in which we are deprived of and endowed with power? How do we be honest about where we are coming from so we can better see the world we are facing.

Facilitated by Andrea and Dylan, two queer anarchists based in Montreal.

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Ce n’est qu’un début: La philo avec les enfants (FR)

Saturday, May 27, 3pm – 4:45pm

CÉDA, Room #125

About the film: Their names are Azouaou, Abderhamène, Louise, Shana, Kyria ou Yanis, they are between 3 and 4 years old when they begin to discuss freely and all together about love, freedom, authority, difference, intelligence …

Organized by the Montreal Childcare Collective

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Anti-gentrification struggles: Reflections and Practices (FR)

Saturday, May 27, 3pm – 4:45pm

CCGV, Room 1.100

Gentrification is a complex process with multiple social consequences. But sometimes we confuse the consequences with the causes. Increased control over an area by police or urban planners and its facilitation by trend marketing are the most visible expressions of gentrification. How is this process orchestrated? Above all, communities of resistance take root in the struggle against these transformations. What lessons can we draw from other cities, and how can we apply them to our local struggles? How can we make links between communities in struggle? And what actions can be taken? In short, how can we stem the tide of gentrification?

Presented by members of chlag.info, an anti-gentrification committee based in the neighbourhood of Hochelaga.

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The commons in contemporary radical politics (EN)

Saturday, May 27, 3pm – 4:45pm

CCGV, Room 2.100

Facilitated by Silvia Federici. Silvia is a feminist activist, writer, teacher, and author of Caliban and the Witch: Women, the Body, and Primitive Accumulation and Revolution at Point Zero: Housework, Reproduction, and Feminist Struggle. In 1972 she was one of the co-founders of the International Feminist Collective, the organization that launched the international campaign for Wages For Housework (WFH). In the 1990s, after a period of teaching and research in Nigeria, she was active in the anti-globalization movement and the U.S. anti-death penalty movement. She is one of the co-founders of the Committee for Academic Freedom in Africa, an organization dedicated to generating support for the struggles of students and teachers in Africa against the structural adjustment of African economies and educational systems. From 1987 to 2005 she taught international studies, women studies, and political philosophy courses at Hofstra University in Hempstead, NY. All through these years she has written books and essays on philosophy and feminist theory, women’s history, education and culture, and more recently the worldwide struggle against capitalist globalization and for a feminist reconstruction of the commons.

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No Gods, No Masters, No Peripheries: Global Anarchisms (EN)

Sunday, May 28, 11am – 12:45pm

CÉDA, Room #119

Was anarchism in areas outside of Europe an import and a script to be mimicked? Was it perpetually at odds with other currents of the Left? Silvia Federici and Raymond Craib will take up these questions of geographical and political peripheries. Building on recent research that has emphasized the plural origins of anarchist thought and practice, they reflect on the histories and cultures of the anti-statist mutual aid movements of the last century beyond the boundaries of an artificially coherent Europe.

Silvia Federici is a feminist activist, writer, and a teacher. In 1972 she was one of the co-founders of the International Feminist Collective, the organization that launched the international campaign for Wages For Housework (WFH). In the 1990s, after a period of teaching and research in Nigeria, she was active in the anti-globalization movement and the U.S. anti-death penalty movement. She is one of the co-founders of the Committee for Academic Freedom in Africa, an organization dedicated to generating support for the struggles of students and teachers in Africa against the structural adjustment of African economies and educational systems. From 1987 to 2005 she taught international studies, women studies, and political philosophy courses at Hofstra University in Hempstead, NY. All through these years she has written books and essays on philosophy and feminist theory, women’s history, education and culture, and more recently the worldwide struggle against capitalist globalization and for a feminist reconstruction of the commons.

Raymond Craib teaches in the Department of History at Cornell University. He is the author of Cartographic Mexico: A History of State Fixations and Fugitive Landscapes. Recent essays include “Sedentary Anarchists,” in Bert Altena and Constance Bantman, eds., Reassessing the Transnational Turn: Scales of Analysis in Anarchist and Syndicalist Studies and “The Firecracker Poet: Three Poems of José Domingo Gómez Rojas” (with original translations of Gómez Rojas’s poetry) in New Letters: A Magazine of Writing & Art.

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Building A Solidarity City Together! (FR)

Sunday, May 28, 11am – 12:45pm

CÉDA, Room #125

Learn more about migrant justice organizing in Montreal, and the campaign to build a Solidarity City.This presentation and workshop, open to all, is intended to provide context and background to the Solidarity City campaign of Solidarity Across Borders, and to encourage the participation of more organizations, groups and individuals. A Solidarity City is the creation of a community that rejects a system that engenders poverty and anguish, not solely for immigrants and refugees, but also for other Montrealers confronting these same realities. We are opposing fear, isolation, precarity and division. We strike back withsolidarity, mutual aid, support work and direct action.

Presented by Mylène & Jaggi, members of the Solidarity City Committee of Solidarity Across Borders.

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Silkscreening for the Revolution (FR)

Sunday, May 28, 11am – 12:45pm

CCGV, Room SS 100

A hands-on silkscreen and printing workshop.

Sidetracks is a community art collective devoted to empowerment, self-determination and collective liberation.  As a collective of activists and artists, we work within an anti-oppression framework toward social and economic transformation. We share skills and resources to create art in the spirit of self-representation and revolution.

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Anarchism and Tenant Organizing: Building Neighbourhood Power (EN)

Sunday, May 28, 11am – 12:45pm

CCGV, Room 2.100

Like many other urban areas these days, Southern Ontario is currently facing an onslaught of gentrification. Yuppie developers and large corporate landlords are gobbling up real estate at a frantic pace, and their investments are leaving displacing tenants and destroying communities in their wake. Faced with the daily effects of capitalist urbanization, anarchists have responded with a variety of tactics and strategies. In Hamilton, one of these projects has been the formation of a network that aims to organize on a building, neighbourhood and city-wide scale, with the goal of developing a force that can mount an effective struggle over urban territory. This workshop, presented by three anarchist members of the Hamilton Tenants Solidarity Network, will explain their own participation in this project, and will make the case that tenant-based neighbourhood organizing is an important and strategic intervention for anarchists to be engaged in.

Facilitated by the Hamilton Tenants’ Solidarity Network (HTSN), a self-organized movement by and for tenants in Hamilton, ON.

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Anarchy 101 (EN)

Sunday, May 28, 1pm – 2:45pm

CÉDA, 2515 Room #119

Confused by what the word anarchism means? Interested in discussing radical ideas that have inspired and shaped uprisings and struggles for liberation across the world? This introductory workshop will focus less on the historical roots of anarchism and more on the daily relevance of the anarchist ideas. To be discussed are the anarchist desires of anti-authoritarianism, self-representation and revolution that shape the practices of mutual aid, solidarity, direct action, community and self-liberation with the ultimate goals of autonomy and sovereignty. If these words are confusing don’t be intimidated! Everything will be explained as simply as possible rooted in our current Montreal context.

This workshop will be facilitated by Dylan, a genderqueer anarchist who’s been in Montreal for the past eight years.

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Drugs in Anarchist Scenes: Confronting Taboos and Sharing Knowledge (FR)

Sunday, May 28, 1pm – 2:45pm

CÉDA, Room #123

This workshop/discussion talks about drugs in the anarchist milieu. Its goal will be to look for solutions for when problems with drugs occur within a group. How to protect the group and come to the aid of individuals within an anarchist framework. And if the time permits, it will touch on questions like how to end prohibition – yes, but how? At the end of the workshop, there will be a short session on overdoses and how to react in order to save lives.

Facilitated by Jerome, an activist for the inclusion and rights of drug users, who works for a community organization taking a by-and-for approach.

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No Wall They Can Build: Confronting the US-Mexico Border Wall (EN)

Sunday, May 28, 1pm – 2:45pm

CÉDA, Room #125

No Wall They Can Build, an upcoming book, scrutinizes the borders that control movement around North America. Drawing on nearly a decade of solidarity work in the desert between Mexico and Arizona, the authors uncover the real goals and costs of US border policy, who benefits from it, and what it will take to change it.

This workshop and discussion will be facilitated by Raúl Alcaraz Ochoa. Raul was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and grew up in Richmond, California. He has organized around educational justice, youth power, LGBTQ justice, mass incarceration and migrant rights issues. After graduating from the Ethnic Studies Department at San Francisco State University in 2006, Raúl moved to Tucson, Arizona, where he worked as an organizer with immigrant families, day labor workers and LGBTQ asylum-seekers in detention. He currently resides in Houston, Texas organizing to build power among people directly targeted by the police state and working towards “a world where many worlds fit.”

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Towards a Queer Insurrection (FR)

Sunday, May 28, 1pm – 2:45pm

CCGV, Room 1.100

This year we are presenting a workshop aiming to explore how the insurrectionalist tendencies in so-called North America are distinguishable from these same tendencies in Europe. We wish to orient our conversation around the influence of queer struggle and modes of thought in Montréal and elsewhere as they relate to insurrectionary practices.

Facilitated by Charlie and Jordan.

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Working Through Assault, Disposability, and Abuse in Anarchist Communities (EN)

Sunday, May 28, 1pm – 2:45pm

CCGV, Room 2.100

This workshop engages with abuse and disposability culture within anarchistic communities and theorizes strategizes to combat this. In particular, the workshop will center how bodies deemed expendable- Black, Indigenous, Mixed-race, women and femmes, poor, disabled, trans, and gender-non-conforming people- are often disposed of within anarchist communities, and/or deemed dangerous. This workshop will examine how language, social status, and varying understandings of action alter effective social justice work in anarchist communities. For example, how the likelihood of Black individuals being read as predatory or dangerous informs social justice work in anarchistic groups. This workshop aims to initiate healing around these experiences, emphasizing the experiences of those harmed in anarchist communities. As a group, we will work through these traumas utilizing various methods.  Using story-sharing, noise, and mutual strategy-making, the workshop will give space to participants to use ‘play’ and self-determination to articulate their own experiences of abuse within anarchistic communities, with the goal of forming and fostering healthier communities.  Artistic supplies and musical instruments will be supplied.  While this workshop aims to center the experiences of those most vulnerable to assault, disposability, and abuse in anarchist communities, all are welcome to participate.

Raissa Simone is a multi-disciplinary artist currently based in Montreal, QC. Their work centers around trauma processing, art as intervention, and Black-centric theorizing.

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LiveArt: Au moins il nous reste le doigt d’vote (FR)

Sunday, May 28, 1pm – 2:45pm

outdoors, near CCGV

A participatory workshop, part of Art & Anarchy, facilitated by David Widgington.

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Anarchist Strategies to Shut Down the Tar Sands (EN)

Sunday, May 28, 3pm – 4:45pm

CÉDA, Room #119

For years, anarchists have been fighting alongside indigenous rebels to shut down the Athabasca Tar Sands. The anti-pipeline movement has inspired many over the past few years, and due to a combination of economic factors and resistance, the oil boom has ended. How can we best understand the current political moment in order to effectively strike against the petroleum industry that is at the heart of 21st century capitalism?

This workshop will be presented by a member of the Rebel! Rebuild! Rewild! collective who has been involved in the anti-pipeline movement since 2012.

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Disability and Anarchism / Disability in Anarchism (EN)

Sunday, May 28, 3pm – 4:45pm

CÉDA, Room #123

This is a workshop about disability and anarchism and disability in anarchism. This workshop will be about the interactions and intersections of anarchism and disability, and the experiences of disabled people in anarchism / disabled anarchists. This workshop will also address some of the paternalistic attitudes towards disability and disabled people that exist in anarchist communities – for example, the seemingly automatic equation of “accessible” with “less conflictual.”

Facilitated by Noah Eidelman: “I do a lot of workshops, I’m frustrated with the undervaluing of support work in anarchist communities, I hate the state, and I really like pigeons.”

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Trouble #3: Refugees Welcome (EN)

Sunday, May 28, 3pm – 4:45pm

CÉDA, Room #125

The Solidarity City Theme Room at the Montreal Anarchist Bookfair will launch the documentary film “Refugees Welcome” by sub.Media. This edition focusses on three battlegrounds of migration: the Mexico-US Border, the US-Canada Border, and Fortress Europe. The documentary brings you the voices of migrants and supporters: from the US, we speak with activists from No More Deaths; in Canada we speak with activists from Solidarity Across Borders and a Palestinian refugee; in Europe, we hear from anarchists who open up squats for migrants in the Netherlands and Greece, and refugees from Iran and Sierre Leone. Film to be followed by collective discussion.

Trouble is a brand-new monthly show offering an in-depth anarchist analysis of current struggles, tactics and movement dynamics. Trouble broadcasts first-hand accounts and perspectives from organizers on the ground, with the aim of cutting through the fog of misinformation that often clouds our understanding of the world, and provoking people into taking bold, collective action. Presented by sub.Media.

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Subverting politics, culture and economics: the journey of the Autonomous Social Center and of Building 7 in Point-St. Charles (FR)

Sunday, May 28, 3pm – 4:45pm

CCGV, Room 1.100

In the wake of a heated struggle, a coalition of antiauthoritarian and grassroots community groups in a working-class neighbourhood of Montreal “expropriated” Building 7 and 1 million $ from a capitalist developer to set-up autonomous self-organised economic initiatives. After having taken act of how the Autonomous social center subverted politics, culture and economics, we will debate how we frame concepts/issues that, as anarchists, we grapple with in our organising: economics and capitalism, revolution and organisation.

Anna Kruzynski is an anarchist organiser and engaged-scholar based in Tio’tia :ke (Montréal).

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Handling sexist and sexual violence in anarchist scenes: How to think of a justice that participates in the abolition of systems and structures of oppression (FR)

Sunday, May 28, 3pm – 4:45pm

CCGV, Room 2.100

Transformative justice takes root in the values and the conflict resolution processes of indigenous communities and the communities of racialized, LGBTQI+ and (prison) abolitionist communities, particularly in the United States. In opposing themselves to the judicial and carceral system of the state, this approach aims at a transformation of structures and the schemes of thought of the different axes of domination. With this workshop, it is proposed to reflect upon the usage of principles of transformative justice through various questions: what are the possibilities for opening this practice to thinking through sexist and sexual violence in our scenes, but also for thinking through the putting into practice of the anarchist values and ideas in our activisms and the places where we live? How to adapt this idea in the places where we live and the militancies that aren’t always our communtiies? And what the limits of this alternative justice in our scenes? The workshop also aims to open up a space for discussion to share and put into perspective different experiences.

Facilitated by Laurence and Geneviève, two feminist activists.

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Self Defense for Women, Trans*, Gender Non-Conforming, and Femme Folk (EN)

Sunday, May 28, 3pm – 4:45pm

outdoors, near CCGV

Self Defense for Women, Trans*, Gender Non-Conforming, and Femme Folk

Beginning with discussion of barriers we may face when seeking to learn self-defense skills, this is largely an opportunity to actively practice self-defense techniques in a trauma-informed environment.  I invite those who: have never practiced fighting skills in a class/workshop setting; have trauma histories which keep them from practicing fighting techniques;  feel deterred from training in martial arts gyms because of brodude culture; wish to sharpen their ability to defend themselves and others from harm.

Facilitated by Schroder, a cage-fighter femme hailing from North Carolina.